Thursday, May 03, 2012

My First Published Article (and a give away with AD/Adornments!)!

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As most of you know, I've always wanted to write.  So far, my writing has been blog posts, private journals, short stories for the fun of it, and the Bead Soup beading book.  I've been trying to do something other than tutorials so wrote the blogging inspirations eBook, "Follow the Path" (you can find that in the column over on the right).  But I was SUPER excited some months back to get a writing assignment for BeadTrends' May issue. 


I wrote an article for their Jewel School section called "The Art of Simple Strung Jewelry".  I feel strongly that strung jewelry sometimes gets the short end of the stick.  I've taken classes in everything from metal smithing to soldering, lampworking to macrame, yet stringing never fails me.


One of the things I wrote about was how being a "stringer" is not a bad thing.  Some forums have had heated debates about what constitutes handmade and how stringing is simple and for beginners.


Not so!


Strung bracelet with dyed howlite, 
handmade clay gingko bead by Courtney Breul
and clasp from AD/Adornments.


Through the article, I give some of my tips and tricks for making strung jewelry even more special.  In the piece above, I made a bracelet with dyed howlite, a handmade polymer clay bead, and a subtly textured clasp.  The smooth double-drilled square beads, paired with the texture of the chips, gives the bracelet visual appeal, and the addition of an art bead and a special clasp makes simple turn into stunning.  And if you're new to art beads, using just one in a bracelet is a great way to start your collection.



Strung necklace with handmade lampwork beads by DudaMart,
Swarovski crystal, matte onyx,
and clasp by me.

This necklace lets the beads speak for themselves.  With such decoration, I knew all I had to do was string, but I also had to consider the continuation of the pattern at the back of the neck.  I didn't want to just string plain round beads that matched in color but lacked in flavor.  Eventually, I found some matte onyx beads that matched the shape of the black and white stick beads, and there you go.  The addition of a simple but handmade clasp gives the necklace an ending that doesn't overpower the decoration of the glass.



Strung bracelet with polymer clay beads by Barbara Bechtel,
vintage acrylic, and Green Girl Studios winged heart.


In this bracelet, it's a mix of texture, color, art beads, and vintage beads.  The beads are chunky but lightweight, so when I decided to use the pewter heart, I knew I needed to counterbalance the weight with a large toggle.  Keeping in mind not only the weight of your beads but the balance of the entire piece is important -- use a clasp that's too small, and your entire creation will look less "finished".  With sterling silver as expensive as it is, I've experimented more with pewter, and in this bracelet, was able to use a large pewter toggle at a fraction of the cost but equal impact.


And now for the giveaway!



To celebrate my first magazine article, I'm giving away a beautiful selection of beads from one of my favorite suppliers, AD/Adornments.  I remember vividly discovering Kathy's amazing beads and chains at my first Bead and Button Show years ago, and I love, love, love her shop!



You'll get a pair of vintage rhinestone charms, a large ornate bronze cube bead, four very cool silver-tone cylinder beads, a pair of silver-tone filigree earring findings, and a large matte gold-tone clasp.


To win, leave a comment answering the following question:

What is your favorite stringing tip, trick, or style?


(Be sure I can contact you, 
and Facebook or blog about the giveaway
for extra chances!)

Winner will be announced Sunday May 6th



Photobucket
Lori Anderson creates jewelry for her web site, Lori Anderson Designs, and wrote the blog An Artist's Year Off.  She is the creator of the Bead Soup Blog Party.

126 comments:

  1. Stringing is not simple at all. I have taken all the metalsmithing classes, enamel classes etc. I think it ranks right up there. Finding and or making the elements that go with the stones, wrapping the wire so it is perfect looking. Please! I kind of gave up and now I just make components and leave it to other people who do it far better than I do!

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  2. I would say, embrace imperfection. I don't know how many things I have torn apart because of tiny errors. Sometimes it is warrented to correct the error, but most of the time, I say embrace it.

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  3. Congratulations on the article! I have heard those same discussions about how people start stringing and then "graduate" to something "better." Ugh.

    Hmm ... My favorite stringing tip is if you think you want to restring something, but are not sure if it will be better or worse, take a photo. That way, you have the security of knowing you can go back to your original design if you want.

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  4. I don't "String" anymore. But that's just me. My jewelry is made primarily of Lace and ribbons, with a bead, vintage pearl, set (glued) here or there......You'd have to see pieces on my sidebar of my blog.

    It's not that I don't appreciate stringing things together,,,,trust me, I do. I have several artistic pieces which involve intricate stringing...I just kind of start with a colorway,,,,and embellish that......

    I always love beads/stones/"bling" and the likes,,my pieces have just kind of taken a different route!

    Thank you for sharing, the opportunity and the insight!

    Hugs and Love
    Shell

    (Garden Crown Giveaway on my blog till May 15th~ http://Bungalowbling.blogspot.com )

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  5. I am so excited for you! I can't wait to read this - and it is very "on topic", too! My hardest designs are "strung" vs wire-wrapped - I oftentimes feel like something is "missing in the mix". Love that bracelet with Courtney's bead - wonderful color combinations! Congratualtions to you!!!

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  6. WHOOT!! Congratulations. I do think stringing is an art, sometimes the beads need to sit and brew before the light bulb flashes and then it just becomes amazing. I like to see what the beads tell me and then I start creating.

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  7. I love AD Adornments, I am so lucky that they come to the Twin Cities Bead Bazaar 1 time a year...I wish they came both. Love your strung jewelry. I will look for your article as I got my very first Bead Trends Mag a few weeks ago. Congrats would love to have those!

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  8. Anonymous8:30 PM

    Anytime I string a necklace or bracelet I always use a wire guardian and crimp covers for a neater look and more professional look. One thing I love about both of them is that they come in many colors be it silver, gold, antique brass or copper.

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  9. Congratulations! I can't wait til this comes out.

    I used to think I was just 'playing' at making jewelry because I hadn't made any of the components that went into the piece..literally, the only part that was 'mine' was the design itself. So, I learned..I have taken classes, and I have to say that imo, the design and finding what flows is vitally important...to get that 'feel' that it all works together. I used to have to have every color match with the rest of the piece, very monochromatic in many ways...and now, I like to add an odd POP of color! I discovered that I LOVE COLOR!

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  10. Well i am not much of a stringer but my best pieces are a combo of stringing and wire wrapping.

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  11. I doubt it could be called a trick, but using multiple strands seems to be what receives the best feedback for me. Second to that anything with charms, dangles, fringe, etc. which baffles me but again that is what the people rave about.

    Glad you're expanding your list of published pieces. Congrats!

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  12. Yay for your article!
    I can't wait to read it :)
    My favorite is using wire. I don't do it all too often but by far it's my favorite look and the possibilities are just endless!
    Thanks for the chance to win! *

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  13. Now this is an issue I would like to see! I started with the basics of stringing and even though I have delved deeper into metal smithing and such I still love to string some pretties all together!!! These pieces you shared are all lovely Lori!

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  14. Your pieces are just gorgeous! I love the stunning black & white necklace!

    There IS an art to stringing--bead placement, fit, color, texture, bead size and so much more goes into making a strung piece.

    For my strung pieces I love using art beads and assymetry. It never gets old for me.

    Thanks for the chance to win these beautiful beads!

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  15. Congrats Lori! So thrilled for you! My favorite tip? Use wire guardians & crimp covers for a professional finished look.

    As for what style I like, I really love them all, but love asymmetric designs. It's somewhat of a challenge for me to keep it asymmetrical & yet balanced at the same time....a fine balance.

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  16. I love wire working....but also enjoy stringing with trial and error figuring out how to slay the crimps and covers.....when I crimp....first as all tutorials tell you the first crimp the wires must be in there own channel...when I do my second crimp I use the tips of the crimping tool and give the edges of the crimp a little extra squeeze.....I like to cover with a bead over a crimp cover but will use a cover if need be...I place it in the second space of the crimp tool..it makes it so much easier to attach.....thanks so much Miss Lori for another generous giveaway...xox

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  17. I love wire working....but also enjoy stringing with trial and error figuring out how to slay the crimps and covers.....when I crimp....first as all tutorials tell you the first crimp the wires must be in there own channel...when I do my second crimp I use the tips of the crimping tool and give the edges of the crimp a little extra squeeze.....I like to cover with a bead over a crimp cover but will use a cover if need be...I place it in the second space of the crimp tool..it makes it so much easier to attach.....thanks so much Miss Lori for another generous giveaway...xox

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  18. I like to use wire guards as it prevents the wire from weakening and stops the wire from putting a grove in the clasp.

    ~cryssT

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  19. I like to use wire guards as it prevents the wire from weakening and stops the wire from putting a grove in the clasp.

    ~cryssT

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  20. I actually started my jewelry journey wire wrapping, and when I saw Stringing magazine for the first time, it was like an epiphany for me. I certainly didn't think there was anything easy or amateurish in there! Now I prefer stringing over wire, but I like it all. Sometimes the best pieces incorporate a variety of techniques. And heck, most of what they sell in high end jewelry stores is 'strung', so obviously customers love it!

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  21. When I string, I put a binder clip at each end of the stringing material so that I can pick the piece up and "try it on" This way I can tell if I have strung two beads in a row that don't really lay well together, or if I have misjudged the size I can easily add or take away from both size to fit.

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  22. congratulations!!!

    i love stringing... used to do just that on necklaces and bracelets... now, i love to mix it with ribbon or wire wrapping in between the beading.. makes things more interesting.

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  23. Anonymous8:52 PM

    I've not done enough stringing to be able to answer the question, but I did post the info on my FB page. Congrats on the article! GOOD article! Why pigenhole a piece of jewelry as "beginner" or "easy"!? That can be so discouraging for anyone! People that do that think of themselves ENTIRELY too highly and not someone you want to hear an opinion from in the 1st place! Just let each other create and enjoy the process! OK, I'm getting off my soapbox now! LOL
    lastaten@embarqmail.com
    Lisa Staten

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  24. Congrats on your article! My favorite stringing tip? I lay out a design and look at it for a days...maybe making some changes, looking for the perfect combination before I put it togeer.

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  25. Congrats on the article - I can't wait to read it!

    I still like to string jewelry, too. I don't do it as often as I used to, but it's always very fulfilling. I think that's why I enjoy teaching my 'beginner' classes (as everyone calls them) so much.

    My favorite stringing tip is one you already touched upon - to balance your designs when doing a bracelet so the focal bead doesn't end up falling towards the bottom of your wrist all the time because your clasp is much too light. Great advice! Thanks for sharing Lori!

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  26. Congrats!! I am happy and excited for you! I am still a novice, but I love stringing, it's quit calming for me! I don't really have any great tips, but loved readying the things the more experienced designers had to say.

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  27. UGHH, the 'stringer' label just irritates me to no end. I first encountered it @ the very first Bead & Button in Austin yrs ago & again 2 weeks ago from my metalsmithing teacher. She wants the 'silversmith' jewelry label to diferentiate from 'stringers' for shows. I'll stop before I go into a fullfledged rant but grrrr. Now I'll go find your article :D

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  28. Congratulations Lori!! I am so excited for you, and now wish I was subscribed to this magazine! I am still a newb at the entire art of designing jewelry, but I love stringing and find it very calming! I also enjoyed reading all of the other posts and seeing the awesome strung creations in you post! I will share this on my FB as well!!

    Hollermate, Tabatha

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  29. Oh Lori, I'm so thrilled for you. I hope there are many more opportunities in the future for more articles.
    You know me, I'm a beadweaver; but I love mixing a beaded component with gemstones and crystals. It makes for a nice element of surprise.
    Thank you for such a wonderful giveaway. :)

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  30. Congratulations Lori! I know that this has been something that you have worked hard for. So proud of you! I agree that stringing is something that is an important first step. Yet it never fails me and I come back to it time and again. My best tip is to work in balance, like that bracelet with the heavier pewter heart and the toggle as a counterbalance. I think that is really important. And there is actual weight and visual weight. I will have to look for the issue. Congratulations again!
    Enjoy the day.
    Erin

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  31. my base is stringing and my best tip is, even though you may not like the way you put the beads together, someone else very well may!

    btw, congrats on the article

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  32. I can't believe that is your first! You are so good at it! Congratulations!!
    My favorite stringing technique is to add chain too. This allows for easy sizing from necklaces to bracelets. I like the way it looks too and it is always fun to source different chains!
    Cilla
    www.tellyourgirlfriends.com

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  33. I love AD Adornments, Lori, so thanks for the chance to win! I use crimp covers, I know people don't but I don't like the look of crimps. However, I've seen people just use beads or rings and might try that myself!

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  34. Congratulations Lori Dear. Your writing is so understandable and full of first hand knowledge. Stunning pieces. Please don't enter me in the drawing...I just wanted to honor your being published in Bead Trends! Blissful...

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  35. Oh thanks Lori...I love this shop....and I forgot one very important tip when crimping....I always attach the beading wire to a closed jump ring...this is the most important step for a secure hold....

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  36. Geeesh...I'm so sorry...taken so many meds for my pnemonia I forgot to say how much I enjoy your writing...I love your ebook a lot and your blog posts are always amazing.....love ya...xox

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  37. Congrats on getting the Bead Trends writing assignment! I'm looking forward to buying a copy just to read your work.

    My best tips for stringing? If the arrangement does "feel" right, let the piece sit, unfinished, overnight. Fresh eyes the next day (or the next week) will likely reveal the "obstacle." Also, don't be afraid to take it apart and re-purpose the beads elsewhere - you just never know where they'll "fit." Above all, have fun!

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  38. Plan ahead. Lay the beads out and take a long hard look - maybe even take a photo. It's easier to rearrange than un-string.

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  39. Congratulations on the article. I'm looking forward to it!
    I use Beadalon for a lot of my stringing. But when I want to make a knotted necklace, my favorite stringing tool is a tri cord "tin-cup" knotter that I bought years ago from Rio Grande. I didn't use it right away...When I started stringing necklaces with knotted cord (ie. waxed linen) I finally started using it. It is great for keeping an even space between knots.

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  40. My tip would be to intuit when to string and when not--the decision IS an art. Your three pieces illustrate this perfectly; I see the artistry in each one, and your descriptions highlight why each one "works." So glad you got a chance to elaborate on all this in an article. Congrats.

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  41. Congrats on your article! I can't wait to read it.
    My favorite style of strung jewelry is a long design that you can wrap around your wrist several times.

    Thanks for the opportunity!

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  42. You are so right about stringers getting the short end! Participating in so many art shows, we often hear "Oh, her. She's just a stringer." Well, as with just about any jewelry making technique, there are ways to do it okay or even better. If I'm going to take the time to make something, I'm going to do my best to do it in a way that I think is better. I don't just flatten crimps, which I've actually seen on some very expensive jewelry in shows.I do the second step to fold the crimp over and then I use a crimp cover. They can be found now in antiqued brass, antiqued or shiny copper, gold, gunmetal, whatever you need. I also use wire guards attached to soldered jump rings at each end.

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  43. I'm trying again, I love your designs Lori, the way you put so much personality in each piece. You have the gift of stringing. Where that just isn't my strong suit. I am addicted to seed beads and can't ever get enough of putting tiny little beads together in endless ways. So much like stringing, but yet also so very different. Love the pieces you have highlighted. Great job on your publications.

    This is my third try, they say the third time is a charm. We'll see!

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  44. Great pictures Lori! Congratulations on the article.
    I guess for stringing my tip (although not really a tip) would be to make sure the wire is strong enough for the beads used, and to use crimp covers and wire protectors for a more finished look.

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  45. Congrats on the article Lori! I have a feeling this is just the first of many! My favorite stringing material is strong elastic because I love the easy on/off aspect of it. Except for some new wire bangles I recently made (another easy on/off variation), my elastic pieces are my favorites and what I tend to wear most often. I can’t wait to get my May issue and read your article!

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  46. I really haven't done that much stringing yet, so I don't know that I have a favorite trick/tip. But I do like to mix all kinds of things together and have a tendency to make my pieces very chunky. I love your pieces for the giveaway.

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  47. Woohoo! Congratulations, Ms. Author :-)

    Stringing...is NOT simple and easy! There is SO much more to stringing than just putting in one bead after another.

    As for tips...I have none, so I guess I can't really enter the giveaway. Or maybe I'd like to say...there are SO many things you can string!!! Beading wire, waxed cotton string, yarn, ribbon, even chain!!

    But I loved your post, so had to comment :)

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  48. Congrats. on the article! I will have to get this issue!

    I usually am hyper-critical about what I string so I string it, put bead stoppers on it, take a picture of it, then walk away from the piece of jewelry for at least two days. When I come back to it and if I love it, it is worthy of a clasp. If I hate it or feel indifferent about the design I rework it.

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  49. I have seen the respect for stringing increase in the last few years. Perhaps it's the crowd I have been hanging around with, but it also seems that the publications available to us have also been taking stringing more serious as well. I find it so encouraging! I think that the one tip I have is to practice the absolute BEST craftsmanship possible when making jewelry. I have enjoyed reading all of the other tips! Thank you Lori for such a creative contest! I would love to post this on my blog, will try to figure out how. LOL

    I can't wait to check out your article! I will have to go out and snag myself a copy this weekend.

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  50. Wyatt White recently said stringing is coming back and coming back big! I have to be honest, to me stringing is the greatest challenge. I can learn many techniques like dapping, wire work, even chainmaille, and the techniques do make my jewelry look savvy. Technique can carry my jewelry design so that for me getting creative becomes more about gaining a skill, not art.

    In comparison, stringing is like writing. Both begin with a blank page and it is the words or the beads -- their rhythm, their relationship, their associations, their juxtaposition, their nuance, their emotion, their beauty -- that makes the literature or the jewelry good. Thus, it is the artist who carries literature as it is the artist who carries stringing.

    I am well-published author. I love literature and the literary arts. My publications are my greatest success, yet jewelry is my love. I'm so happy that your dream of publication has come true, Lori. To write and to make jewelry are the best of the arts, in my opinion. Every time I look at your jewelry Lori -- every time -- I am moved! Just as I am moved by good literature!

    I find courage to string by the story I can tell in my jewelry. So my stringing advice is to create jewelry as prose, as a novel, or a poem. Tell your story with stringing. Give the piece a title, an intention, an energy and a beat. Make it a memory, a day dream, fiction or non-fiction, an ending of relief or an ending of contemplation. And enjoy that every time you see or wear that piece, you can think of the stories that are within it, that inspired it -- the stories that are a part of you and those you love taken up and celebrated, each moment suspended in its light and heat.

    Congratulations Lori!
    Rita

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  51. Your so right about stringing, there are so many beautiful beads that just stand on their own, stringing is the very best choice of displaying them. A perfect example is your lovely pink and purple bracelet.

    Congratulations on your article can't wait to read it.
    Cool giveaway!

    Theresa
    outofwackk@aol.com

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  52. Congratulations on the article Lori. I have to say I don't find stringing easy at all, especially getting that last crimp bead on without having too much wire showing at the end. I'm hoping your article has some tips on finishing off. Your bracelets and necklace are beautiful.

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  53. Congratulations on your publication!!! My favourit stringing thing is to mix medias, especially my own beads and wire, but I am trying to add nore things that are new to me and expand my tool box...!

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  54. DESPINA3:42 AM

    I already congratulated you on your great article, so helpful and inspiring for beginners, like myself!!
    For simple stringing I make sure I have great a color combo in mind and at least one handmade element in the design.

    My best,
    DESPINA
    deb_oro@yahoo.gr

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  55. Joanna-Gloria3:43 AM

    Great article, I have read it already
    :))
    For stringing, I emphasize on durability, bold patterns and color combinations and handmade beads or elements combined with more "common" ones...

    Joanna, yana_ven@yahoo.gr

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  56. Congrats Lori!

    My favorite thing to do lately..besides always adding some sort of chain to a piece, is just one single pop of color that really stands out. I am also a crimp cover kind of woman. If it doesn't have the crimps covered, it feels unfinished. I even went into a bigboxstore *insert mans name here that begins with a 'M'..lol*, and ended up fixing their display pieces that they had on a table while the salespeople were trying to sign shoppers up for their beading classes! I can't stand a sloppy piece!

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  57. I found your article to be WONDERFULLY helpful! I'm completely self taught (meaning, I've never taken a class, but i spend a LOT of time reading books, magazines and the internet). I jumped into making jewelry and, after 4 pieces of "simple stringing" I was experimenting with stuff WAY beyond my skill level. As a result, I never really learned the basics. Your article was so clear - any wanna-be jewelry designer (like me) could "get it". Thank you for that!

    Now, why is it that lovely fresh water pearls have such little holes?????

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  58. High Five Lori, can't wait to read the article. My tip: always keep your bead size in balance with your pendant size.

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  59. I saw your article in Bead Trends -- I've started getting it as an electronic publication as it is not easy to find here in Australia. It was a great read and for a fledgling jewellery designer like me, very useful! I picked up some great tips from it for stringing (and a lot of the tips will be equally applicable to the other thing I like to do -- simple wire work). My favourite style? Right now it's stringing on leather. But I have lots of ideas using stringing and I'm getting the hang of crimping and so on.

    And BTW, I never would have picked it as a first time article -- congratulations! I remember the first articles I wrote as a science writer that were published -- it was so exciting to see my name in print and to realise that people might actually find what I had written useful or informative or thought provoking -- so I am wishing you an abundance of words!

    melissa_trudinger at yahoo dot com

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  60. I saw your article in Bead Trends -- I've started getting it as an electronic publication as it is not easy to find here in Australia. It was a great read and for a fledgling jewellery designer like me, very useful! I picked up some great tips from it for stringing (and a lot of the tips will be equally applicable to the other thing I like to do -- simple wire work). My favourite style? Right now it's stringing on leather. But I have lots of ideas using stringing and I'm getting the hang of crimping and so on.

    And BTW, I never would have picked it as a first time article -- congratulations! I remember the first articles I wrote as a science writer that were published -- it was so exciting to see my name in print and to realise that people might actually find what I had written useful or informative or thought provoking -- so I am wishing you an abundance of words!

    melissa_trudinger at yahoo dot com

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  61. Congratulations on your good news. How exciting!
    I agree with several others regarding the use of wire guardians and crimp covers, but I think my best two bits of advice for other 'stringers' would be 1. to step out of your comfort zone with color, texture and form and 2. be willing to make mistakes. I have been pleasantly surprised many times when I put things together that are not 'my taste'. ( I always need a nudge when doing this, which is one reason I am excited to participate in 'Bead Soup' this summer.)
    Thankyou for the opportunity to weigh in and the chance to be in the giveaway :-)

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  62. Congrats on the writing assignment. Stringing is definitely an art with many considerations to creating a great piece. I put my closures on last, using little clips to hold the beads on while I string. This allows me the flexibility to work the design from either end.

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  63. Congrats! I enjoy stringing and find that it is important to make sure you use the correct materials when you string. You do not want use a string that will not hold your beads.If you do and your beads are too heavy, it will break.

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  64. Congrats on the article! My favorite stringing tip is to have tons of bead stops - those spring-y things that keep your beads on the wire until you're ready to finish :-) minimizes hunting for lost beads under the desk

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  65. That's so wonderful about being published. congrats!!

    I don't do a lot of stringing myself. But I love the asymmetrical style where each side of the focal is different. Hmm, now I'm starting to wish I could head to my work room instead of going to work!

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  66. Love your insight....and I totally agree ! I began stringing, out of necessity, fixing broken pieces I could not bear to lose. my tip, use the premadr wire guardianor french boulion to protect your stringing materisl from wearing out. Kris Mattingly Bhm, Al

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  67. Anonymous6:04 AM

    Congratulations on the article production. Since I am fairly new in the beading world, my tips are not many. However, when I bead I feel like I have accomplished a big deal. As for it being the bottom rung on the ladder to some, I still have my moments when I have a pair of earings that I have beaded and when they are done and said, I look at them and the stones are not the same or I have put them into different order. I actually have measured my table and placed tape where 6 inches is, 18 inches is and so on. As I am the one that loses the ruler all the time. Also I string with at least 2 strings and I knot in between my beads so that if they break only one bead falls. It saves a lot of heart ache. I will also cut my wire or string sometimes and tie a button to the end not being used until the beading is done, so they wont fall off. Thanks Cindy MRITECH813@AOL.COM

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  68. Congratulations on your article!! When I'm stringing a piece, I usually try to figure out my design before I string it as it's easier to move things around when they aren't already strung. If I'm not sure about a piece, I take pictures so I can go back to it if I take it apart. I also like to use "french wire" and crimp covers to finish my pieces.
    Thanks for the opportunity to win such great beads/findings!!

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  69. Anonymous6:47 AM

    I have only used wires to string up...and sometimes use the elastic bands for the simple bracelets for my daughters and their dolls.

    Usha
    usharaneem@yahoo.com

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  70. Congratulations on the article!!!

    My tip - don't finish either end until you are certain you like the look/length etc.

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  71. Congratulations! I think you are quite right that stringing gets the short end of the stick when it comes to recognition as an art form. It's odd that because I think there is an art in the visual composition of these types of jewelry that is difficult to master that goes above and beyond the technical aspects you mention. Thank you for sharing your insight into stringing. It's been a good lesson for me.

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  72. Lori, Congrats on your first article. This blog post today spoke to me and touched me more than you know. I am a "stringer" and lately I have felt discouraged in making just stringing pieces and have been doubting my abilities as a jewelry maker. I don't think they stringing jewelry gets the credit that is due. Your pieces are lovely and each time I see one I think WOW. My trick, tip is color. Play around with color and don't be afraid to do monochromatic. Some of my favorite pieces are shades of one color.

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  73. You are absolutely right Lori, stringing never fails me! I love working with multiple strands and weaving size and texture together - usually in something long! - Of course it has to have an handmade clasp!

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  74. Congratulations!!!!! I love to make sure the bracelet or necklace puddles in myhand before I secure the crimp:-)

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  75. Lori -congratulations on the article - I am so happy for you-I know you really wanted to expand your writing. Can't wait to read it. I like to do asymemetric things and usually throw in some chain. I love handmade clasps also.
    rmar261783@aol.com

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  76. Congratulations on another step in your journey. I can't wait to read your article Lori! Like most beady gals, I started with stringing then moved on to wire and metal, but I have always done a little stringing throughout. I like to finish my stringing with wire guardians or French bullion and think tornado crimps are more secure and finished looking.

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  77. Loved your article, Lori - congratulations! My tip for stringing would be to use crimp covers for a more finished look. I like to combine stringing and wire wrapping.

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  78. Not entering the giveaway, just commenting, congrats on your article, just picked this mag up yesterday, will have to go have a look see!

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  79. Congrats on achieving one of your goals. I don't do a lot of stringing but when I do I can not live without bead stoppers or I will let all the beads fall off one end...lol. I also love wire guardians and crimp covers. Will FB and try to blog....I am actually out of town.
    Sonya

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  80. Congratulations Lori! For me, there's nothing that beats the drape of a strung piece. I like the free-flowing movement of beads on a string. I bothers me that it gets such a bad rap. I will have to get a copy of that magazine.

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  81. Lori!! Congrats!! I am a bit surprised to hear that this is the first article!! This is long overdue!!!I have been stringing more often lately and I love it!! Often I find that stringing with very unusual and unexpected bits to lead the eye to a wonderful and unusual focal!!
    I hope that qualify s as a tip!! I must check out your article!!

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  82. Congratulations! Design, Design, Design!!! (Don't enter me in your give-a-way, as lovely as it is. I must use what I have at home!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!) Hugs--

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  83. Congratulations Lori thats great news!
    Stringing can be a real artistic expression and it is certainly one of the things I love to do, especially if I am making most of the components myself. A little tip for making it extra nice if you use something like Bead Pro which I prefer to beading wire is to use French wire or Bullion to finish each end it is very professional looking on an expensive necklace or bracelet.
    Jackie

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  84. Bead Trends is my favorite magazine. Congrats to you!

    I think that when stringing beads size, texture and color of the beads makes the design. When I get stuck on color, I often get my color wheel out or look through some art books for interesting combinations.

    Thanks for this fabulous giveaway!
    baymoondesign@gmail.com

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  85. Congratulations on the article!! what a coup for you!!

    i'll be honest here....i don't really do beading...i dabble and don't really know what i'm doing...ergo, i found you and i keep coming back!! (^-^)

    i just really like to come and see what you and your friends are doing...it gives me great ideas....which i tell my friend who DOES do beading and she "helps" me ( and when i say "helps" i seriously do mean 'she just goes ahead and does it for me'!!)

    i just really come to see all the "bead art porn" (so to speak!!).
    thank you!!!

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  86. Congratulations on your article for Bead Trends! Hope you can keep this going, another multi-tasker! Enjoyed your post. A stringing tip that hasn't been mentioned, Probably everybody knows this one, but when I have a hank of seed beads on that fine string, I just push the beading wire through as many seed beads as I can from the end. You can pick up an inch or more and it goes very fast. Are you coming to B & B this year? Thanks for Giveaway op!

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  87. I love Rhea's comment to "embrace imperfection." I started stringing beads with the chunky wooden blocks in Kindergarten or Sunday school. I "progressed" to an Indian bead stringing loom. And after that I think I stalled. I am now in my 50s trying to find my childlike exuberance and reawaken my creativity.
    Reading your blog posts (and also group conversations) has improved my education but I need to overcome my fear of not moving forward knowing I can not do something perfectly from the start.
    So, my stinging style? Primitive.

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  88. Congratulations, Lori that's wonderful! You really can do anything you Super Woman.

    I wish I had a tip or trick. I'm a little intimidated by stringing. I tend to agonize over a design and restring a piece endlessly. So my favorite strung style is minimal and super long.

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  89. What a lovely giveaway, Lori! And congratulations on the article!

    I am mostly a stringer, with some wire wrapping thrown into the mix as well. I think the most freeing thing that I discovered after gaining experience as a stringer is that I didn't have to follow a pattern...enter in asymmetry. :-) The newest technique I have learned with stringing is to use the Via Murano twisted crimp tubes. Love those!

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  90. congratulations on the Bead Trends article. I like to use wire guardians, my crimping could stand improving..

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  91. I used to think stringing was simple, yet I never did it as a beginner. I started out with wirework, and recently found myself repairing a couple of strung necklaces. Harder than I thought! I never realised you needed so many different crimps/covers, etc. for a professional look.

    Fab designs, Lori!

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  92. I would never in a million years say stringing is easy or "doesn't count." I am constantly in awe of how so many artists are able to place beads in just the right spots to make something so pleasing. Your photos are perfect examples of this. You put so much thought into the designs. The same beads in the hands of a non-artist type would never produce the same results.

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  93. Congrats on your article! I don't string enough to have many tips, but my mantra while designing is "start simple"- I tend to want to put in every bead I have in the chosen color scheme. I get much better designs when I start with a simple design and just add in a few special beads and components.

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  94. I like to get color inspiration from places or things in nature. The way a white trillium contracts with the green forest floor. The colors of a sunset. A mountain waterfall. I love nature and I think my strung pieces reflect that.

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  95. Being so new to beading, I don't have a whole lot of experience to be passing out info; however, if you're having fun and are using good materials, something good is bound to come from it. "Just try it" is my motto. You'll know when it's right. Then pretty soon you'll have a better eye for what materials to use. (At least thats what I'm hoping for)...oh! And don't be afraid to ask questions!

    Blazesandbubbles AT gmail DOT com

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  96. Im not sure if my last comment posted. Who knows! Anyway, I basically said my experience is very limited but I always try. If you're enjoying what you're dojng then something good will come of it. Ask questions. I have met some extremely nice people learning this form of art.

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  97. I would say to always use crimp covers, it just makes the piece look completed.

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  98. I think that to write off any jewelry making technique as too simple or for beginners means limiting ourselves creatively. Strung strands are such a pretty backdrop for bead embroidery, wire work, and even fabricated metal pieces. They can really make a piece.

    Also, maybe it's just me, but getting those darn crimps to look nice at the end of beading wire gives me more trouble than working with a torch. ;)

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  99. Bravo Lori! I actually already read your article in Bead Trends, when I received my copy last week. Well done!!
    My favorite "stringing technique" right now is creating different stations on wire out of beads and bead caps, and then connecting them with jumprings, to form the necklace. It's not exactly stringing (on string) but it creates an eclectic look.
    The giveaway is fabulous - thanks for the chance to win it!!

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  100. What goes on one side of your focal, doesn't always have to be the same on the other side. But mostly--sometimes wonky is good!

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  101. I find stringing much more difficult than weaving primarily because of all the little hints you just gave in this post. Those things don't come to me intuitively and so most of my strung jewelry looks like a bunch of beads on a string! I've found that the ones I've done successfully almost always have a dangle somewhere -- by the clasp, all the way through, whatever. Dangles are good!

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  102. My best design tip - stay tuned to Lori Anderson's Pretty Things Blog! Not only do I learn from you but your readers too and the BSBP = Priceless.

    I will be looking for a Bead Trends this weekend - you are selling a lot of their mags, aren't you? Proud of you!!! Enjoy your weekend. ~~T

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  103. I can't wait to get my copy of the magazine. Congratulations! I use C-Lon Cord as a stringing material. I really like the nylon cord that comes in a wide variety of colours to match any project. To prevent it from fraying I put a dab of clear nail polish on each end. An added bonus is that it makes it easier to string the beads too.

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  104. I can't wait to get my copy of the magazine. Congratulations! I use C-Lon Cord as a stringing material. I love the strong, nylon cord that comes in a wide variety of colours to match any project. To keep the ends from fraying I put a dab of clear nail polish on the ends. As an added bonus, it makes it easier to string on the beads.

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  105. My favorite tip is to be careful about the finishing, especially with a crimp bead. If you get it too tight, the piece won't be flexible. Too loose and things move around so the wire underneath can show. It is the pits to have to restring the entire piece because the crimp wasn't at the right spot.

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  106. A Gold Star for you Lori on getting published. I want to go that direction some day so I can understand your joy. My best tip is to be present in what you are doing & do it to the best of your ability including finishing well. Don't let other things distract you when you are beading. It is an art form to be able to string well. When I was getting ready for my first show I spent 2 month making strung pieces almost exclusively. I would be honored to win the beads you are giving away for this very special occasion.

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  107. I forgot to say I blogged about your great giveaway. Thanx

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  108. Stringing is an opportunity to let the beads talk. When I am working on metals, or with a seed bead pattern, the pattern takes over. But there's nothing like playing with color and texture of beads and letting them do the talking.

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  109. Congratulations Lori! I'll have to look for that BT issue.
    I so agree with you re stringing. It's all about the beads, clasp, layout and design that can make a piece look like a million bucks. Even though I like to make copper, silver, steel, or brass links, sometimes that Softflex wire tugs at me to be strung!

    And I love Kathy's pieces. I'm so lucky that she lives in my home city and I get to oogle her goodies at several local shows.

    Again, Congratulations - I'm liking your new voice!

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  110. Congratulations Lori, I know you must be over the moon tickled about your article. I find that simple non fussy strung designs are the best and they sell the best also. I love using gemstones in my strung pieces.
    Therese

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  111. Congratulations, my friend!! I'm so excited for you, and I agree 100% - stringing does get the short end of the stick. People think it's easy, but it's one of those things that if you don't do it well, it shows.

    I just wanted to show support, so on the off chance that I get picked for the giveaway, it's totally fine by me if you pick another name. :)

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  112. Here's hoping blogger is being nice!

    Lori, congratulations! I know that Sue @ Suebeads said this already, but I always finish a piece with crimp covers. They are one of my favorite findings. Pieces just are not complete for me without them!

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  113. Congratulations! it's so exciting to see you venture into new things and places, and get wonderful recognition for it :) I love stringing. Most of my customers want strung pieces. I'm still pretty elementary in my designs but that's okay. I'm trying to be true to myself and what delights me. There's lots of room for growth and improvement, but I want to like where I'm at now too! Blessings on this newest foray:)
    Christie

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  114. Stringing is most certainly NOT easy. But it is still my number one choice. I love experimenting with knots. I just made a piece inspired by a "name brand" of jewelry that may not have come out as perfect as theirs but I can call it my own.

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  115. Well - As the name of my blog suggests - I am primarily a stringer and very proud of it!!! I am very much a beginner and still learning with every piece I make, but my tip is to keep adjusting colours and shapes until you are absolutely happy - like a painting, stand up and walk aaway from it frequently - the change of perpesctive often helps the creative, intuitive bit of the brain make itself heard :-)

    Thanks to all the commenters for leaving their own tips :-)

    stringasongofsixpence at googlemail dot com

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  116. For anything works as long as I can hide the endings so the jewelry looks professionally made. Will be sure to look out for your article. Congrats.

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  117. Congratulations, Lori! So glad that you are on your way to writing more articles. Will have to get the magazine out and read it right away.

    So many people have mentioned tips that I use, wire guardins, crimp covers, stringing seed beads straight from the hank. I haven't seen this one that a friend showed me. Use the front of your crimpers on your wirewrapping to squeeze the wire so that you don't get scratched.

    Thanks for the giveaway opportunity.

    Carolyn
    carolynscreations@live.com
    carolynscreationswa.blogspot.com

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  118. Stinging is a matter of design and technique. Technique may be easy to learn...design is not! and that is where the art comes into play.

    My tip is try it, if you hate it, redo it! One of the best parts of stringing is that is relatively easy to take a piece apart and start over.

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  119. Congratulations on your first published article, Lori!!! I can only imagine how proud you must feel!

    Stringing is definitely an art. There is so much more to it than just putting beads on a string and calling it good. As for a tip? I must reiterate what others have said, and say that my best advice is to use crimp covers and wire guardians for a more finished look!

    Thanks for the opportunity to win this giveaway! It is appreciated!

    Stephanie

    stephanie_mcginley@hotmail.com

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  120. Congrats on your Stringing article in Bead Trends. I found it very informative. Your writing syle is lively and interesting!!

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  121. Congratulations Lori on your article and well written!
    My favorite stringing style is to string asymmetrical and introduce contrasting colors and really have FUN with my collection of beads...
    I try to pick out beads I may never choose to bring together at the first glance, and throw myself a little challenge...

    Kaushambi @ Beaditi on Etsy
    beaditi2010@gmail.com

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  122. Congratulations Lori on your article and well written!
    My favorite stringing style is to string asymmetrical and introduce contrasting colors and really have FUN with my collection of beads...
    I try to pick out beads I may never choose to bring together at the first glance, and throw myself a little challenge...

    Kaushambi @ Beaditi on Etsy
    beaditi2010@gmail.com

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  123. wow I am just looking into and made one or two bracelets and this is a great place for me to see. All the tips here are wonderful for someone like me. Have a goodday xoxox

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  124. wow just found this site and I am new to all of this and so many hints here. I have made two or three bracelets and loving it. Thanks for all the comments here. xo

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  125. congratulations!!

    I admit to some snobbery towards "just stringing" but it's born of art jury's feelings on the subject. Jewelry artists at craft/art shows are the most populist groups, and the best art shows won't even let a "simple" stringer in. (some won't let you in unless you are a silversmith)

    Having said that, sometimes just sitting down and doing stringing really hits the soul right. Even if you are doing so artfully you can usually finish several projects in one day, and I miss that sometimes. Doing chainmail, metals / wire takes more time. course maybe I just do stringing wrong and should take more time on it! LOL

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  126. congratulations Lori..how exciting!!!

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